Lincoln County Sheriff – Tip of the Week

Sheriff Lincoln County Logo Tip of the Week

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Dennis L. Dotson

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

Tel (541) 265-4277

Fax  (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: April 11, 2016

HOW LONG WILL YOU BE GONE?

While many of us are looking forward to enjoying the warmer weather, we must remind ourselves that some of our loved ones may find themselves in an uncomfortable predicament.  It could even result in their death.

We are speaking about our pets who accompany many of us on our trips and errands in a motor vehicle.  We should never leave our pet unattended in a parked car.  On warm days, the temperature in a car can rise to dangerous levels in minutes, even with the windows cracked open.

Here on the Oregon Coast, even on what seems like a cool but sunny day, inside car temperatures can become uncomfortable and even dangerously high enough to cause a pet to suffer heat stroke.  Dogs have a normal body temperature of 101 to 102.5 degrees.  They can withstand a body temperature of 107 to 108 degrees for only a very short period of time before suffering brain damage or even death.  Even immediate emergency care may not save your pet’s life.

The brief stop we plan to make at the store could stretch to 15 minutes or more before we know it.  Our mistake could cost our pet its life.  Leaving the windows cracked won’t cool the car enough to protect our beloved pet, even if we have made water available.

Many pets may not care about a trip in the car, but we know that most dogs are excited about car rides.  Most dogs want to go with their owners everywhere, but when the weather turns warm, it may be safer to leave your pet at home or with a trusted friend.

If you observe a pet in a car under this circumstance, call dispatch at 541-265-4231.

For more tips and information, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

Sheriff Lincoln County Logo Tip of the Week

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Dennis L. Dotson

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

Tel (541) 265-4277

Fax  (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: March 28, 2016

BOATING SAFETY-OUR BUSINESS AND YOURS

Summer will be here before we know it, and in the coming weeks, more people will be pulling out their boats from winter storage in preparation for launch in the waters of this state.  Below are suggestions which can contribute to your safety and add to your boating pleasure.

  • Know the legal requirements for your size vessel. Safety equipment must be accessible and in working condition.
  • Wear your life jackets!!  85% of the boating fatalities could be avoided by wearing a personal floatation device.  Remember it won’t save your life if you don’t wear it.
  • Have children and non-swimmers wear a personal floatation device.  Each device should be of   suitable size for the intended wearer and fit securely. 90% of those who die in boating accidents drown.
  • Be prepared and carry extra equipment such as a bailer (bucket), anchor, first aid kit, visual distress signal, tool kit, flashlight and extra batteries, and a cell phone.
  • Don’t over load your boat.  Follow the recommendations on the capacity plate of your boat.
  • Capsizing, sinking, and falling overboard account for 70% of boating fatalities.
  • If your boat should capsize, your best chance for survival and rescue is to stay with the boat.  Pull as much of your body out of the water as possible to preserve body warmth.
  • Hypothermia can be a killer, keep your body dry and warm as possible
  • It is illegal to operate any boat while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.  Use the designated driver concept, a sober skipper is a must.
  • Stressers such as exposure to sun, wind, cold water, vibration, noise, and alcohol all affect your ability to react.
  • Don’t run out of fuel.  Practice the 1/3 rule: 1/3 for trip, 1/3 for return, and 1/3 for spare.
  • Fuel vapors are heavier then air and collect in the bilge.  Never fill gasoline cans in the boat.
  • When anchoring, use a line that is several times longer than the depth of the water and never anchor by the stern.
  • File a float plan.  Let someone know where you’re boating and when you’ll be back.
  • You’re responsible for damage or injury caused by your wake.  Exercise caution around other boaters and docks.
  • As of January 2009, all persons operating a motor boat greater than 10 horsepower are required to carry a Boater Education Card.  The card shows that the operator has passed an approved boater education course or equivalency exam.

For further information on Boating in Oregon, people are encouraged to pick up the Oregon Boaters Handbook available at your Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, or you can visit the Oregon State Marine Board website: http://www.boatoregon.com

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

Sheriff Lincoln County Logo Tip of the Week

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Dennis L. Dotson

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

Tel (541) 265-4277

Fax  (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: March 21, 2016

HOME AND BUSINESS SECURITY

Have you ever wanted to be able to check on your home or business whenever and from wherever you are located?  To see what your pet, children, or babysitter are doing?  Well now you can.

Security cameras are available in a variety of shapes, sizes, and features for your home or business.

Today, new technology places the security of a person’s home or business in their hands.  There are wireless systems and wired systems and with security cameras, there is no need to alarm windows and exterior doors or pay a monthly fee to monitor the camera system.

Wireless systems do not require the use of wire to operate the camera(s).  They are powered by battery or AC adapters and the camera image(s) can be viewed on-demand by the home or business owner.

Then there are wired systems.  Wire must be installed between the camera(s) and a Digital Video Recorder (DVR).  The DVR records what the camera(s) sees and the owner can access that information on demand from their smartphone app.

Regardless of which type of camera a person chooses, the same features can be found on both types.  Consider that your home may only require one or two cameras depending upon the layout of your structure.  A business may require three or more cameras to properly surveil the structure.

Some research is recommended to determine which camera, number of cameras, and available features meet your specific needs.  You may also want to consider a camera for exterior viewing.  We suggest you consider the following features:

  • Motion sensor
  • Night vision
  • Two-way speaker capability – hear what is being said and ability for your voice to be heard in your house or business
  • Immediate notification of the home or business owner via email or to their smartphone when the motion sensor is activated
  • On-demand access to your camera’s view
  • On-demand review of recorded video (fee involved with Wi-Fi)
  • Panning and zoom capabilities

Just think of the power you can have in protecting your property.  If there is ever an intrusion into your property, what kind of a police response do you want?  A low priority response, because the alarm is probably a false alarm, or every police officer in the area responding because you can see the intruder on your smartphone?

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

 

Sheriff Lincoln County Logo Tip of the Week

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Dennis L. Dotson

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

Tel (541) 265-4277

Fax  (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: March 14, 2016

LOST OR STRANDED – HOW TO SURVIVE IN THE WOODS

Let me suggest that if you are not prepared and don’t know about the area you want to explore, don’t go.  Wait and go with someone who’s familiar with the area.  Study maps and search the Internet for more information of the area you’re looking to explore.

Each time Search and Rescue (SAR) teams in Oregon initiate a rescue, we learn more about human behavior and what they might do in a situation depending on their health, experience, and knowledge of the area.  One very important action is letting your family or friends know where you are going, when you are expected back, and most importantly do not hesitate to call for help.  This is a beautiful state we live in, but it can be very unforgiving when the elements and the environment change.

If you are traveling on the back roads and your vehicle breaks down, stay with your vehicle.  Try your cell phone.  If there is no cell service, stay with your vehicle.  The vehicle is your shelter from the elements and your vehicle is easier to spot from a plane or helicopter.  If it is too hazardous to remain with the vehicle, don’t walk further than eyesight from the vehicle.  Often a person attempts to walk out and ends up in more danger than if they had waited.

If you are lost or injured in the woods, stay near a trail and try to make yourself a shelter.  If you can, prepare an area for a warming/signal fire.  Keep in mind the time of the year and the conditions in the woods.  We don’t want to have a forest fire.  Staying dry and warm is very important.  Stay hydrated if it is warm.  Remain calm and listen for searchers and hopefully you have a signal whistle in your pack.  Listen for aircraft in the area and hopefully you have packed a signal mirror or flashlight.

Each year we look for mushroom pickers.  They get turned around and can’t find their way back to their vehicle. Many have been rescued because they had cell service; some have never been found.  Pay attention to the direction you are going and stay as close to the trails as you can.  Some will mark their way in with surveyors’ tape and then collect it on their way out.

It’s easy to get turned around when you walk with your head down all day looking for mushrooms.  This is why it is so important to have a map and become familiar with the area.  Today you can purchase a good Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) device for under $100.00 that can lead you back to where you started.  Most importantly, stay calm and conserve your energy.  Some people panic and wander off from the area resulting in injury.

We hope you plan your trip according to our recommendations.  You can never be too prepared, but being unprepared can cost you your life.  When you choose to explore the areas of this great state, please be safe.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

Sheriff Lincoln County Logo Tip of the Week

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Dennis L. Dotson

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

Tel (541) 265-4277

Fax  (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: February 29, 2016

NOISE ORDINANCE

The basic rule of the county noise ordinance is one of reasonableness.  The ordinance allows Sheriff’s Deputies to investigate complaints of excessive noise throughout the county, with the exceptions of Toledo, Lincoln City, and Newport.  The ordinance states that Sheriff’s Deputies will determine the reasonableness of the noise in determining whether or not to issue a citation for a violation of the noise ordinance.  Deputies have received training and guidance on this issue.

The ordinance states that no person shall cause any noise which unreasonably disturbs or annoys another person of normal sensitivity, while the person is inside of a building.  Here are some examples of what could be considered unreasonable noise:

  • Loud stereos
  • Excessively loud vehicle exhaust, motor, or other mechanical sound.  (Louder than required to operate the vehicle or device)
  • Musical instruments

The circumstances surrounding the noise shall be examined, taking into consideration several factors, including but not limited to:

  • Time of day or night.
  • Nature and zoning of the area where the noise is coming from.
  • Duration of the noise.
  • Volume and intensity of the noise.
  • Whether the noise is plainly audible within the affected building.

You can still use your lawn equipment, complete repairs on your home or vehicle, and warm your car as long as you are acting reasonably.  Please think of how the noise you are making may affect those who live and work around you.  If a citation is issued for a violation of the noise ordinance, the penalty imposed by the court may be up to $500 for the first violation, and $1,000 for each subsequent violation.

If you have to make a noisy repair to your home or vehicle, or otherwise know you’ll be making some noise with a gathering that may disturb your neighbors, some advanced warning from a friendly conversation with the neighbors will likely help everyone get along.  

Certain noise is exempt from the noise ordinance.  Required emergency sirens, emergency vehicles, and approved public gatherings such as sporting events are included in the list of exemptions.  

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

Sheriff Lincoln County Logo Tip of the Week

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Dennis L. Dotson

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

Tel (541) 265-4277

Fax  (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: February 22, 2016

COLORED LIGHTS ON MOTOR VEHICLES

There appears to be some confusion among some motorists about the color of lights that can be lawfully displayed on motor vehicles while travelling on Oregon’s public highways.  Your Sheriff’s Office receives calls from time to time inquiring if a variety of colored lamps can be lawfully displayed on motor vehicles.  Some callers express concern over the use of some colored lights, especially those involving headlights.

There are a number of AFTER-MARKET bulbs and headlights appearing on some motor vehicles that emit a blueish or greenish color.  The argument that a person purchased the bulbs or headlights at the local car parts store is not the standard used to determine if they legal to use or not in Oregon.

Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS) 816.050 states that headlights shall show a white light described in Standard Number 108 of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS).

ORS 816.360 addresses the use of prohibited lighting equipment for motor vehicles in this state as well.  It also identifies the penalty for not complying with this law should a motorist be cited by a police officer.  As a Class C infraction, the fine imposed by a court can range from $80 to $500.

The law states the following:

  • All headlamps must be WHITE in color as defined by Society of Automotive Engineers and Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) 108.  White lamps have been tested to meet all headlamp requirements.
  • Maximum wattage allowed in a headlamp is 70 watts.
  • FMVSS 108 disallows any color coating on headlights and/or headlight bulbs.
  • Blue and green lamps are designated for use on emergency vehicles only.
  • Red lamps to front are reserved for emergency vehicles and school bus warning lamps.
  • Colored bulbs give a distorted headlamp pattern, which may prevent the driver from seeing a person or object at the road edge or starting to cross the road.
  • Blue or other colored lights in the taillights of a motor vehicle are also prohibited, unless the vehicle was manufactured before 1959.

Markings on headlights and their packaging typically indicate if the product is Department of Transportation (DOT) approved.  If the bulb or headlight packaging doesn’t include this information, more research should be conducted with law enforcement before making your purchase.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

 

Sheriff Lincoln County Logo Tip of the Week

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Dennis L. Dotson

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

Tel (541) 265-4277

Fax  (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: February 8, 2016

PRESCRIPTION DRUG ABUSE

The abuse of prescription drugs continues to rise in Oregon.  It is also a problem nationally.  Why is this occurring and how could it happen are only a few of the many questions being asked?

What is an opiate?  One definition is; “An opiate is any of the narcotic alkaloids found in opium.  They are named because they are constituents or derivatives of constituents found in opium which is processed from the latex sap of the opium poppy.”

The availability of prescription drugs is obtainable from anyone who is licensed by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to prescribe controlled drugs.  A person need only visit a clinic and convincingly complain of pain or depression and receive a prescription of oxycodone, hydrocodone, methadone, codeine, fentanyl, meperidine, darvocet, morphine, or other opiate.

But there is even an easier way to obtain these powerful and addictive drugs than going to a clinic.  A person merely needs to look in a family member’s or friend’s medicine cabinet or purse.  There are also those who shop for doctors to obtain drugs and until recently, professionals licensed to prescribe drugs in Oregon were without a tool to prevent doctor shopping.

Today, physicians, dentists, and others licensed to prescribe controlled drugs have a tool that enables them to track a person’s history of obtaining prescription drugs.  Oregon is one of 41 states in the country providing this service to their medical professionals and seven more states are in the process of implementing the service.  But this tool is only as effective as the users allow it to be.  If physicians, dentists and others do not participate in the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program, it will serve little purpose in preventing people from doctor shopping for these opiates and other prescription drugs.

Ask your physician, dentist, or other health professional licensed to prescribe drugs if they are participating in Oregon’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program and if they aren’t, why not?  It’s free, meets all HIPPA requirements, and is strictly confidential.

In addition to this, lock up your prescription medications and prevent others from stealing, selling, and abusing your prescription drugs.  Physicians can request an account at http://www.orpdmp.com/health-care-provider

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

 

 

Sheriff Lincoln County Logo Tip of the Week

OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Dennis L. Dotson

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365

Tel (541) 265-4277

Fax  (541) 265-4926

TIP OF THE WEEK

Date: February 1, 2016

ACCESS AND FUNCTIONAL NEEDS

If you or someone you know has a disability or needs assistance to live independently, take additional steps to prepare for emergencies.  The following tips are found in the 2016 Emergency Management calendar, which can be downloaded at www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement.

Get Informed

  • Know what type of natural disasters might occur in your area.  Prepare for them.

Make a Communications Plan

  • Create a personal support network, and prepare them to assist you with your medical equipment, service animals, and transportation needs.
  • Teach someone in your support network to use your life saving devices and medicine.
  • Make sure they have a spare key to your residence and know where your emergency supplies are located.
  • Have a cell phone and paper contact list ready of regional hospitals, doctors, neighbors, and family and friends—both in and out of your area.
  • Talk to your medical services provider about their backup plan, including power failures and treatments during an emergency.
  • Practice your plan!

Build Two Emergency Kits

  1. This kit includes survival basics: water, food, radio, flashlight, batteries, and first aid for at least one week or longer.
  2. This kit contains important medical, personal, and insurance documents and at least one week’s supply of medicine.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and on your Smartphone via the “MobilePatrol” app and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.